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 Post subject: Unfermented Cigars?
PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2013 3:47 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 18, 2012 10:24 pm
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Awhile back I made a tiny cigar out of havanna 608 i think, dark sea Samson, a tiny amount of burley, and a Maryland wrapper. The Maryland was fermented I think. I also let it sat in my humidor for a few months. This cigar was one of the best I ever had. So I have made a few more but robusto size. So my question is does all tobacco need to be fermented for cigars or just the wrapper or none? My concern is I am growing Sumatra this year as a wrapper and I'm wondering if I should still build a kiln and ferement it or not? I want to hear your advice and opinions.


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 Post subject: Re: Unfermented Cigars?
PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2013 7:27 pm 
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Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2011 9:51 pm
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Location: near Blacksburg, VA
You can certainly smoke cigars of unkilned leaf. The more it is aged, the more smokable it will be. I think you will find that a pleasant cigar will need either color-cured leaf that has further aged at least a few months in suitable conditions, or leaf that has been kilned.

Bob


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 Post subject: Re: Unfermented Cigars?
PostPosted: Fri Mar 08, 2013 7:05 pm 
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deluxestogie wrote:
You can certainly smoke cigars of unkilned leaf. The more it is aged, the more smokable it will be. I think you will find that a pleasant cigar will need either color-cured leaf that has further aged at least a few months in suitable conditions, or leaf that has been kilned.

Bob

Is there a difference in taste between kilned cigar tobacco varieties and tobacco that has been fermented the way cigar tobacco usually is (stacking)?


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 Post subject: Re: Unfermented Cigars?
PostPosted: Sat Mar 09, 2013 12:35 pm 
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Location: near Blacksburg, VA
That would seem like an easy question to answer, but I'm not sure. My thought (no data or references) is that "fermenting" in pilones serves only the create sufficient natural insulation to allow the leaf in the middle to warm itself to a point where the temp and humidity accelerate the enzymatic oxidation processes within the lamina. I believe that a kiln accomplishes the same thing using external insulation and introduced heat.

Minute differences in variety (you seldom know the actual varieties of commercial cigar tobacco), stalk position, color-curing temp/humidity, growing weather conditions, soil status, and of course kilning (or pile curing) temp and humidity, influence the final taste and aroma in subtle ways. I have grown and finished leaf that looked and tasted to all the world like the oscuro wrappers on Hoyo de Monterrey and JR Ultimate cigars. I have smoked Vuelta Abajo leaf grown by Jitterbugdude that strongly suggested the taste and aroma of Cuban Romeo y Julieta. Bigbonner's CT Broadleaf, when kilned, tastes like all CT Broadleaf wrapper.

Most of my cigar tobacco, once kilned, has its own unique set of flavors and aromas, and I love them. As with making your own cheese or wine or pickles or beer, aiming for a mass-produced factory taste is likely to be frustrating and disappointing. Aiming for better than mass-produced factory taste is always gratifying.

Bob


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 Post subject: Re: Unfermented Cigars?
PostPosted: Sun Sep 06, 2015 5:47 am 
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Joined: Sun Jul 26, 2015 9:03 am
Posts: 43
Location: North Dakota
Wedal2 wrote:
Awhile back I made a tiny cigar out of havanna 608 i think, dark sea Samson, a tiny amount of burley, and a Maryland wrapper. The Maryland was fermented I think. I also let it sat in my humidor for a few months. This cigar was one of the best I ever had. So I have made a few more but robusto size. So my question is does all tobacco need to be fermented for cigars or just the wrapper or none? My concern is I am growing Sumatra this year as a wrapper and I'm wondering if I should still build a kiln and ferement it or not? I want to hear your advice and opinions.

I was going to start a thread similar to this one, but I found this post instead....

My first observation is, you stated that "this was one of the best cigars you had ever had...." If that is the case then I would say that the answer to your question is very simple.

Reminds me of a story.... a young woman was going to make a roast and she found herself cutting the ends off of the roast before putting it in the pan. She thought about this a minute and realized that she didn't have any idea why she was doing this.... it's just what her mother always did. So, thinking about this a wile she asked her mother why she cut the ends off the roast before putting it in the pan. The mother answered that she didn't know... that was the way her mother always did it so that is the way that it is done.
Not satisfied with this explanation she went to her grandmother and asked her why she cut the ends off the roast before putting it in the pan.... does it do something to the flavor? Does it make it cook different? Perhaps expose the center of the meat for more juices?... Her grandmothers reply..... "No dear, because that is the only way it will fit in my pan."

I am not saying that we only ferment tobacco because that is the way it has always been done. Fermenting accomplishes a lot for the tobacco, but if you have found something that you really like, don't worry about what everyone else does.

I have rolled several cigars with tobacco that has just been color cured... no additional aging, no fermenting. They certainly do not have the flavor of a commercially available cigar but they do have a very unique, kind of sweet flavor that I like.
That doesn't mean that I am not going to bother with fermenting and aging; tobacco will get better and better with fermenting and aging. But there is no reason I can't partake and enjoy if I like what I already have.

I guess my opinion then is, certainly you should get at least some of your tobacco fermenting, because though you seem to like what you have now, you may like the finished product much better.... but by all means if you like it now there is no reason not to use some of it now.

I realize this is an old thread, but I am sure it still applies to others with the same questions......


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 Post subject: Re: Unfermented Cigars?
PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2015 12:24 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 10, 2012 12:02 pm
Posts: 240
Location: Clover S.C.
I enjoy some first primings after they color cure. The nicotine hit is awesome.At least as a rolled cigarette.


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