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 Post subject: Mullein
PostPosted: Mon Jun 09, 2014 9:46 am 
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Location: NW Arkansas, USA zone 7A elevation 1561 feet
I thought that I had a file named this, but I can't find it.

Traditional and Modern Uses

Mullein tea is a traditional treatment for respiratory problems, such as chest colds, bronchitis and asthma. Mullein leaf tea is slightly bitter; a tea of the flowers is sweeter. Both the leaves and flowers contain mucilage, which is soothing to irritated membranes, and saponins, which make coughs more productive. Research has shown that the herb has strong anti-inflammatory activity, and lab studies suggest that mullein flower infusions have antiviral properties, as well.

Many of mullein’s traditional medicinal uses were similar throughout the Old and New World, but whether European settlers learned to use the herb from Native Americans or vice versa is open to debate. Besides using mullein leaf and flower teas to treat respiratory problems, some Native Americans also used the plant’s roots. The Creek Indians drank a decoction of the roots for coughs; other tribes smoked the roots or dried leaves to treat asthma.

Topical applications were equally varied. The Cherokee rubbed mullein leaves in their armpits to treat “prickly rash.” Leaf poultices were used to treat bruises, tumors, rheumatic pains and hemorrhoids. Mullein flower oil (made by steeping the flowers in warm olive oil) also has been used for treating hemorrhoids, as well as earaches.

Mullein leaves have been used in cosmetic preparations to soften skin. “Quaker rouge” refers to the practice of reddening cheeks by rubbing them with a mullein leaf. And a yellow dye extracted from the flowers has been used since Roman times as a hair rinse as well as to dye cloth.



Read more: http://www.motherearthliving.com/plant- ... z34A1Lzqr8

I have mullein in full bloom all over the place. It is a biennial, so this has to be second year growth... I didn't see them last year. So odd! It is in my driveway, I have to be careful not to run over it, I would have seen it there.
I will wait a few more days let the blooms all get open and my bees work their magic, then I will bag the heads, the blue birds love them and will eat them all.
I haven't personally grown mullein, but the link above does talk about it and a lot more about mullein than I quoted here.
So, just get back with me, if you want some mullein seeds... I tried smoking it and I liked the mild taste... gonna put it in my smoking mix.


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Thu Jun 12, 2014 7:16 am 
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Location: Richmond VA
Very interesting. Sounds like a fun plant to have around. I was looking at the link you posted too and noticed the little section about the hairs being potentially irritating. I was wondering if you could OD on it or anything haha.

Also, how do you prepare it? I'm not familiar with growing teas. Do you just dry out the leaves and flowers to make a tea out of it?

-Jak


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Thu Jun 12, 2014 7:25 am 
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Location: Townsend, MT
This stuff grows wild in my neck of the woods. It works awesome for colds. I've never smoked it. My mother in law makes a tea with it in it for colds. The natives used this stuff medicinally for years.

It also works great in a pinch for TP. :)


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Thu Jun 12, 2014 7:29 am 
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Location: NW Arkansas, USA zone 7A elevation 1561 feet
Hi Jak,
I haven't made a tea out of it...
It grows wild, considered a nuisance in some states.
I do it like tobacco, and wait for it to naturally begin to turn yellowish... then I harvest it... I do bag the seed-heads if anyone wants seeds.
When it is dry, I just moistened it to case, cut it up and rolled a cigarette out of it... with the filter on the smoke, I didn't get any hairs...

It was pleasant, but no nicotine... it was used medicinally, so I think that I would like to add it to my smokes.

I think for tea you would do the same thing just instead of casing and cutting, make tea... then strain the tea... The hairs are soft and have never bothered me at all... it feels soft like a baby animal fur.

Mullein: Mullein has a lot of body and burns well, but has no relaxing effect. This is good if you’re just looking for an every day kind of smoke. Mullein also cleanses the lungs and brings up congestion, so if you are quitting smoking or have quit already, Mullein is a good lung restorative. *TIP: Make sure the mullein isn’t too dry, because this causes the smoke to be more harsh. You can always remist lightly with a little bit of water. Also, rub the mullein between your fingertips to fluff it up.*

http://harmonyherbals.net/blog/make-you ... oke-blend/


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Thu Jun 12, 2014 8:23 pm 
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Location: Coastal Texas
Oooh I would love to snag a few seeds from ya! It sounds like a great plant to have around. Ill send ya something in return. :D


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Thu Jun 12, 2014 8:55 pm 
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Location: NW Arkansas, USA zone 7A elevation 1561 feet
Okay, I will get out there and get some of the flower stalks bagged... then mix the seed from different plants to keep genetic diversity going... I don't know if there are other kinds of Great Mullein... but it is always good to get seeds from more than one plant in known varieties of things, surely good for weeds too!

Check your state laws and make sure that it is legal in your state! In some states it is a nuisance and not a good weed to grow... not illegal like marijuana, but illegal still.


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Thu Jun 12, 2014 9:38 pm 
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Location: central coast of Kalifornia
IIRC, Lonnie used mullein in his chew recipe...
It's buried in his posts, somewhere.
rc


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 1:11 pm 
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Location: NW Arkansas, USA zone 7A elevation 1561 feet
The bed of a 3/4 ton Dodge truck is completely full of mullein.

It is in bloom, not quite ready to be harvested, almost... but it is in a location where it was going to get destroyed... so we got it first.

I still have lots of mullein growing near my driveway, that will be allowed to set seeds, the seed stalks are already a couple feet tall.

And new baby mullein plants are all around, I see how I missed it, it is barely sticking up at all... easy to miss first year plants.

We are trying to remember where mullein was in earlier years... it seems like some of the spots it took 4 years to start and other areas return every year.

I did a lot of research more on mullein, not just smoking, cough syrup, and tea...

It restores lungs, and it stops pain, and one guy said it is rich in the minerals potassium and magnesium and even calcium... I need to research that claim...

But, I have lots and lots to play with...

I hope that since it is blooming that it will be mature enough to dry down properly.


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 1:36 pm 
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Location: NW Arkansas, USA zone 7A elevation 1561 feet
Wow... more info than I even dreamed of... it doesn't seem to be a source of calcium... correct that... but look what it says about it in two different places:
Mullein is a plant. The flower is used to make medicine.

Mullein is used for cough, whooping cough, tuberculosis, bronchitis, hoarseness, pneumonia, earaches, colds, chills, flu, swine flu, fever, allergies, tonsillitis, and sore throat. Other uses include asthma, diarrhea, colic, gastrointestinal bleeding, migraines, joint pain, and gout. It is also used as a sedative and as a diuretic to increase urine output.

Mullein is applied to the skin for wounds, burns, hemorrhoids, bruises, frostbite, and skin infections (cellulitis). The leaves are used topically to soften and protect the skin.

In manufacturing, mullein is used as a flavoring ingredient in alcoholic beverages.

How does it work?

The chemicals in mullein might be able to fight influenza and herpes viruses, and some bacteria that cause respiratory infections.
http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplemen ... me=MULLEIN

http://www.naturodoc.com/library/nutrition/herbvit.htm

I may be boring many of you sorry... I just am fascinated by all this info on simple mullein, a weed... growing wild....


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 1:55 pm 
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Location: central coast of Kalifornia
NO no!

NOT boring me!

It's nice of you to post a synapsis of all the things you have read!

..it's like putting a subject into a search engine and getting 4,547,382 results in 1.324 seconds... how can someone possibly review all the various documents on a subject??? I suppose that may be why pinterest is getting more popular, these days.

Best
rc


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 2:02 pm 
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Location: Townsend, MT
Ozark Lady,

Have you ever read about Essiac tea? It's an herbal treatment that was researched and administered by a nurse in Canada in the 40's? It's primarily a cancer treatment but it is made entirely of weeds. My grandfather in law used it along with traditional treatment for colon cancer. He recovered so well the doctors were amazed. When he told them what he was doing they wrote it off add being part of what they had prescribed... We all knew the truth... The doctors all said he looked / responded better than people much younger. In fact the oncologist brought in other doctors to see how good the areas they radiated looked... The stuff works. As does mullien. :)

Plants are fascinating things. Many of our modern drugs are a result from synthesis of plant derived chemicals. :)

Look up Essiac tea, you'll find some very fascinating things!!

Cheers,

Joe


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 2:41 pm 
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Location: NW Arkansas, USA zone 7A elevation 1561 feet
I sure will, thanks for the tip, I don't have cancer, but it might be great as a way to never, ever get cancer! Most of our bodies fight off cancer on a daily basis and just in a weak moment does it gain a foothold.... No weak moments, eh gang?

I saved so far, 33 pages on mullein... and many links...
And I find many other things to look up.

Remember the right-of-way where there were sand boxes of tobacco and I retired the area? It is now full of Pokeweed... and I am fascinated at how often poke is showing up in my herbal research on mullein... it is next in line, since I could easily get another pick up load of just the poke and all lining my driveway... all on my property! Sheesh.. I suspect that grandkids were playing with pokeberries and tossed them out there! I cook poke as three different vegetables: asparagus, greens and okra substitues... it is good.. but I had no idea that it is so good for me..

Medicinals that I can get for free and they are growing right here... well, why spend the big bucks at the pharmacy for this stuff with side-effects? Mullein's only known side effect is... some folks are bothered by the fuzz.... some folks not all.

I guess there is an advantage in living in a weed-patch, forest lined area, compared to well manicured lawns etc... I have been eyeballing my sons dandelions though... I don't have grass, hence no dandelions.


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 4:54 pm 
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Location: NW Arkansas, USA zone 7A elevation 1561 feet
It poured down rain this morning. Then it cleared off and we got the mullein...

We came inside to cool off, and while we did it clouded over... boy is it humid!

Final tally, 53 were on the truck, now hanging up. And without walking any further than the garden and the house... we count 23, but there are 5 in the distance, that we are sure of and there may be more on past them.

What a bumper crop of mullein! I usually get really happy over half a dozen! :lol:

At least if it dries green it is still usable, just not for smoking.


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 9:47 pm 
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Gosh it would be great if we could make just a few bucks off all this effort!

But then we'd need to talk about it elsewhere!

:-)
rc


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2014 12:27 am 
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Location: NW Arkansas, USA zone 7A elevation 1561 feet
The four main herbs that make up Essiac are Burdock Root, Slippery Elm Inner Bark, Sheep Sorrel and Indian Rhubarb Root.

Today, burdock root is used in oncology for its cancer-curing properties, particularly in Russia and India. Many herbalists say burdock root can stop cancer cells from metastasizing. Preliminary research has demonstrated that burdock root has certain protective properties that may explain its cancer benefits.

Slippery elm (Ulmus fulva) has been used as an herbal remedy in North America for centuries. Native Americans used slippery elm in healing salves for wounds, boils, ulcers, burns, and skin inflammation. It was also taken orally to relieve coughs, sore throats, diarrhea, and stomach problems.
Slippery elm contains mucilage, a substance that becomes a slick gel when mixed with water. It coats and soothes the mouth, throat, stomach, and intestines. It also contains antioxidants that help relieve inflammatory bowel conditions. Slippery elm also causes reflux stimulation of nerve endings in the gastrointestinal tract leading to increased mucus secretion. The increased mucus production may protect the gastrointestinal tract against ulcers and excess acidity.

Sheep Sorrel: In present times, the plant’s leaves are the parts used for both medicinal and culinary purposes, though the plant’s roots have been historically used as an astringent and coagulant. The entire plant, including roots, is used as the main ingredient in essiac tea. And though sorrel is considered by many to be a nuisance weed, its presence and usage have provided numerous benefits for people across the years.

These three I found a lot about. The Indian Rubarb root about all I found about it was that it is good for the digestion.

I found a website selling the concoction that is Essiac tea. And of course no measurements to make it at home. But, at least I found out what the ingredients are... or at least the major ones.

Looks like burdock root makes my list of herbs to research, and I think that I saw a burdock plant growing beside my front porch.
I knew that plant looked familiar and very healthy, it is young, but I was thinking, I need to look that up... and it sure looks like burdock. More research, better pictures to positively id it. It will be very cool if it is burdock, and I think that I saw more like it growing near the mullein.

This thread can get huge... maybe turn into a decent resource.. may have to have Roy help us to create a medicinal herbs category! Or just herbs, lots of time food is medicine, as well as, nourishment.


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