How to Grow Tobacco

How to grow and process tobacco at home for personal use. This is a non-commercial hobby website.
Tobacco Picture Gallery Click Here
It is currently Fri Sep 22, 2017 10:08 am

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 103 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2014 12:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Feb 22, 2013 1:39 pm
Posts: 479
All of the states around Colorado are watching the job market. So far NM has had a large request for constuction workers (skilled). Seems OSHA and MSHA want clean help on site. NM contactors are reluctant to hire out of Colorado now due to rec. pot.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 10:43 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:16 pm
Posts: 1572
Location: West Central Fl.
Hi
Today I had a call from some woman in Jacksonville Fl. I quickly said I'm on do not call list. She said thats Okay it doesn't pretain to us. I'm with the ..... breast cancer something. I said I like breasts but don't like cancer.
"thats why I'm calling for your help......(money). "
I said "looks like you are determined to bother me"
she says"we are fighting cancer"
" I don't want to fight cancer. I want a cure for cancer. Tell the government to legalize Marijuana so we can cure it . Even with out a Dr."
SHE HUNG UP. ANY REASON ?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 5:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Feb 22, 2013 1:39 pm
Posts: 479
Yes- Obama care. They try to get what they can now befor the need is gone LOL


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 5:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Feb 22, 2013 1:39 pm
Posts: 479
Yes- Obama care. They try to get what they can now befor the need is gone LOL


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Tue Aug 26, 2014 10:20 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 16, 2010 3:41 pm
Posts: 866
Location: NE Washington
Medical marijuana could reduce painkiller abuse, study suggests

http://www.latimes.com/science/la-sci-m ... ?track=rss

Could medical marijuana be an antidote for the nation's scourge of fatal overdoses caused by prescription pain medication? A new study suggests the answer is yes, and it's set off a flurry of medical debate over the risks and benefits of making cannabis more widely available to patients.

The new research, published Monday in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, finds that deaths associated with the use of opiate drugs fell in 13 states after they legalized medical marijuana. Compared to states with no formal access to marijuana, those that allowed certain patients legal access to cannabis saw a steady drop in opiate-related overdoses that reached 33%, on average, six years after the states' medical marijuana laws took effect.

"The striking implication is that medical marijuana laws, when implemented, may represent a promising approach for stemming runaway rates of nonintentional opioid-analgesic-related deaths," wrote opiate abuse researchers Dr. Mark S. Brown and Marie J. Hayes in a commentary published alongside the study. "If true, this finding upsets the apple cart of conventional wisdom regarding the public health implications of marijuana legalizations and medicinal usefulness."

That apple cart has already been shaken by a growing body of research that suggests marijuana's psychoactive ingredients may enhance the pain-killing effects of opiate drugs, allowing patients using marijuana for pain to take lower — and less dangerous — doses of opiate medications.

"It's so apparent that our patients can decrease, diminish or wean themselves completely off of opiates, and that it improves their quality of life," said Dr. Donald Abrams, a UC San Francisco oncologist who was not involved with the study.

In a small study published in 2011, Abrams found that cancer patients taking morphine and oxycodone experienced greater pain relief at lower opiate blood concentrations when a vaporized form of marijuana was added to their drug regimen. He has just begun recruiting for a study that will explore whether the same formulation can reduce pain, inflammation and opiate doses in patients with sickle-cell disease.

But those who have opposed expanding access to medical marijuana said they were not persuaded that cannabis — a plant designated by the Drug Enforcement Agency as having "no recognized medicinal use" — is a safer alternative to opioids.

"Clearly the study raised an intriguing hypothesis, but many questions still need to be answered," the National Institute on Drug Abuse said in a statement released Monday. The analysis "should not be oversimplified," the statement warned.
It's so apparent that our patients can decrease, diminish or wean themselves completely off of opiates, and that it improves their quality of life. - Dr. Donald Abrams, a UC San Francisco oncologist who was not involved with the study

Patients in 23 states and the District of Columbia now have the option of seeking a prescription for medical marijuana. (Two of those states, Colorado and Washington, also allow recreational use of the drug.) Chronic pain is thought to be the leading indication for cannabis use.

The study authors, led by the University of Pennsylvania's Dr. Marcus A. Bachhuber, focused on the years 1999 to 2010. The raw figures collected from states' death certificates showed that rates of fatal opioid overdoses were higher in the states that had implemented medical marijuana laws than in those that had not.

But the researchers took those raw numbers and adjusted them so that it would be easier to make direct comparisons between the states. For instance, they accounted for the fact that each of the states that legalized medical marijuana during the study period did so on different schedules. In addition, they took into account a wide range of factors known to influence opioid abuse, including state unemployment rates and policies tightening access to prescription painkillers.

The results showed that after a state began to implement a medical marijuana law, the rate of its non-intentional opiate overdose fatalities fell compared to those of states without such laws.

And that comparative decline picked up steam over the first six years after the laws went into effect. On average, the statistical analysis showed, states passing medical marijuana laws saw annual reductions of roughly 25% in their opioid-related death rates compared to states with no such laws.

In their first year after implementation of the laws, the 13 states averaged an opiate-related fatality rate 20% lower than those of states without legalized medical marijuana. The average difference between the two groups of states widened at two and three years out, returned to 20% in year four, then rose to just over 33% in years five and six.

About 60% of the nation's fatal opioid overdoses occur among patients who have legitimate prescriptions for their medications. The authors wrote that in states where access to medical marijuana is legal, legitimate opioid drug users may take lower doses of that prescription pain medication, making overdose less likely.

Others may use marijuana in place of benzodiazepine drugs — sedatives that make a fatal overdose much more likely. Still other patients who might initiate opioid medication use — and go on to risk overdose — may never start if they are able to get pain relief from medical marijuana, the study authors wrote.

"That connection may be intrinsically appealing — some might view the idea that people could use a milder drug versus an opiate as an improvement," said Kevin Sabet, director of the University of Florida Drug Policy Institute, in a statement. But the new study suffers from "too many uncertainties" to allow that conclusion, he said.

Dr. Mark Ware, a pain specialist and professor of family medicine at McGill University in Montreal, called the JAMA Internal Medicine study "very interesting, and methodologically robust." But, he added, "there's probably a temptation to extend the findings of this study to far broader conclusions than are justified."

The United States "is conducting a natural experiment" on a national scale, said Ware, who is executive director for the Canadian Consortium for the Investigation of Cannabinoids, an advocate for more research on marijuana's medical potential.

Before physicians and government officials can draw conclusions on the public health benefits of medical marijuana laws, he said, they need more detailed studies of how medical marijuana users take the drug and how its use affects physicians' prescribing decisions, especially for patients with chronic pain.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Tue Aug 26, 2014 10:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 16, 2010 3:41 pm
Posts: 866
Location: NE Washington
Marijuana Use Lowers Risk Of Domestic Violence In Married Couples, Study Finds

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/2 ... 11217.html

Past research has indicated that couples who abuse substances are at a greater risk for divorce, in part because substance abuse often leads to an increase in domestic violence.

However, new research has found that when it comes to marijuana use, the opposite effect occurs: couples who frequently use marijuana are actually at a lower risk of partner violence.

Researchers from Yale University, University of Buffalo and Rutgers recruited 634 couples from 1996 to 1999 while they were applying for a marriage license in New York State. After an initial interview, the researchers followed the couples over the course of nine years using mail-in surveys to measure the effects of marijuana use on intimate partner violence (IPV).

The study defines IPV as acts of physical aggression, such as slapping, hitting, beating and choking, and it was measured by asking couples to report violence committed by them or toward them in the last year.

At the end of the first year, 37.1 percent of husbands had committed acts of domestic violence.

Marijuana use was measured by asking participants how often they used marijuana or hashish (defined as pot, weed, reefer, hash, hash oil or grass) in the last year. Participants were also asked about other drug use including alcohol, because, as the researchers explain the study, marijuana and alcohol are often used in conjunction.

What the researchers found surprised them: due to the fact that alcohol and other substances are known to increase domestic violence, they hypothesized that marijuana use would have the same effect. But that was not the case.

"More frequent marijuana use generally predicted less frequent IPV for both men and women over the first 9 years of marriage," the researchers wrote. Not only that, couples who both used marijuana frequently -- compared to one spouse using it more than the other -- had the lowest risk for partner violence.

Why would marijuana be different than other substances? Researchers hypothesize that the positive side effects of using marijuana may actually reduce conflict and aggression. They note that previous research has found chronic marijuana use to blunt emotional reactions, which could in turn decrease violent or aggressive behavior between spouses.
.......

"At the end of the first year, 37.1 percent of husbands had committed acts of domestic violence."

37.1% had committed "acts of physical aggression, such as slapping, hitting, beating and choking,".... Are you freekin' kidding me?! I found that sentence a bit shocking. heh I'd think (hope) the divorce rate would be at least 36.1% by year two.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Wed Aug 27, 2014 2:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:16 pm
Posts: 1572
Location: West Central Fl.
hi
This was interesting to me too. Second one was eye opening as we neither one fight with each other. But wife's first husband was a drinker and wife and child beater. That is why he was ex.

The first on pain killers I enjoyed. wife uses a little for pain when she cain't get relief from her meds. So we know that it works for her. I haven't used any for 35 years . Save it for wife.......lol
I do use some pain meds from different Drs. I was getting oxycodone from one Dr. basically on an as needed basis. the prescription said take One every 6 hrs as needed for pain . not more than 4 a day. I had been useing it off and on for 5 years. never used 4 in one day but did use some each week. I thought I would cut down as much as possible so stretched last bottle and a few extras left from other months out to a year. Finally saw was low so reordered from last bottle. Dr ,changed ne to Naproxen I tried it 2 days and it didn't work so looked it up. Generic name for Aleve......
Called the Dr and said it didn't work why did you change it. She said "You hadn't ordered any for a year so didn't need it any more" I said" I had a test and had to fast 2 days doesn't mean I don't have to eat any more. " So if you use a lot you are abusing it and get hooked if you cut it down real low don't need it.
Wife used it for a while but they changed her to Methadone so she would not get hooked , Then Governor put a limit on how much Methadone could come into state so she could not get any one month. Thats when she started on pot and it sure works better. Think we may move to a legal state.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2014 8:02 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:16 pm
Posts: 1572
Location: West Central Fl.
Was thinking about war on drugs and said it is really a war on pot. Then thought I have had a direct relative in every war the U S A has been in. Starting with 3 grandfathers in revolutionary war. Including some that were battles and not declared war.
The war on pot is another civil war. One started by the government against the people. Well this is My second war and I am fighting my own government. Yep and we are winning. :lol:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Thu Oct 09, 2014 8:49 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:16 pm
Posts: 1572
Location: West Central Fl.
wow
saw what Adrian Wylley saws about marijuana here in Fl.and he is running for governor here in Fl.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Thu Oct 09, 2014 3:49 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2014 9:36 am
Posts: 45
people should be allowed to grow and use any plant they are able to in whatever way they wish, as long as it doesn't negativly effect anyone else...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2014 4:27 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:16 pm
Posts: 1572
Location: West Central Fl.
Hi
First is happening in Washington D C Second is happening in Colorado. Last is whats happening in Fl.

http://dcmj.org/ballot-initiative/

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/08/ ... 0B20140808

http://wyllieforgovernor.com/marijuana- ... ght-heart/

Me I'm planning boat trip. maybe there is hope for this world.
Have fun, stay healthy, send money Lee


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2014 1:52 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 16, 2010 3:41 pm
Posts: 866
Location: NE Washington
Lee,
Very sorry to see medical marijuana didn't pass in Florida. I mean, wtf, not even for medical reasons? How could anyone oppose that? I dunno. And why did it need 60% to pass and not a simple majority?

Seems Oregon has joined WA and CO making it legal now. So did DC. I expect it will pass in Alaska too. It was legal there back in the 80's until the feds blackmailed AK into changing their laws. They withheld all federal funding until AK complied with the feds laws. (I despise what our Federal gov has become. I pray for an asteroid to hit DC and take them all out).

Maybe you should move to the NW. If you do, bring a little Florida sunshine along. We have entered the long dark rainy/snowy dregs of winter weather now. About a month from now you could trade 20 mins of warm sunshine for a big fat bag of weed.

It's good to see the Red team get control of the house and senate though. By golly, things are gonna be different now! LOLOL Yeah, right. Different sides of the same coin. Nothing will change. Nothing.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2014 7:24 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:02 am
Posts: 5538
Location: central coast of Kalifornia
Asteroid... :shock:
rc


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 103 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group