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 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 8:20 am 
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Posts: 11
Location: Ballina, NSW, Australia
Hey guys!
New to the forum so i won't go off on a tangent strait away :)

There is a few factors that contributed to the prohibition of cannabis in the US which eventually was forced upon the rest of the world using the 1936 the Convention for the Suppression of the Illicit Traffic in Dangerous Drugs act.

Harry Anslinger of previous alcohol prohibition law enforcement fame(now essentially unemployed), William Randolph Hearst of journalist and publisher fame(responsible for the propaganda) and the Dupont paint company who had just created plastic.
Harry Anslinger needed a new job after alcohol the prohibition was lifted. He had William Randolf Hearst publish false stories about Mexican teens smoking the "reefer" and murdering their entire families. It was these newspaper articles that Harry Anslinger produced in the hearing to criminalize cannabis which at the time was only referred to as Marijuana(the Mexican word for dirty weed).
It was a 3 minute hearing in which Harry made a few racial slurs regarding colored jazz artists and illegal Mexicans breeding with upper class white folks.

After roughly 3 minutes, cannabis was outlawed in the USA. Little did anyone know at the time that this new law included Hemp, one of Americas biggest cash crops. The hemp industry was soon replaced by petroleum based plastic products and the chemical age started.

Large pharmaceutical companies do not want it legalized as they are not able to patent a plant.

I could go on about this for days and days but i'll leave you guys with this for now :)

Annual Causes of Death in the United States

Related Chapter:
Overdose

(Annual Causes of Death, By Cause)
Cause of death (Data from 2009 unless otherwise noted)1 Number

All Causes, 2009 2,437,163

Diseases of Heart 599,413
Malignant Neoplasms 567,628
Chronic Lower Respiratory Diseases 137,353
Cerebrovascular Diseases 128,842
Poisoning 41,592
Drug Overdose (2010)2 38,329
Intentional Self-Harm (Suicide) 36,909
Septicemia 35,639
Motor Vehicle Accidents 34,485
Firearm Injuries 31,347
Alcohol-Induced 24,518
Pharmaceutical Drug Overdose (2010) 22,134
All Illicit Drugs Combined (2000) 17,0003
Opioid Analgesic Overdose (2010) 16,651
Homicide 16,799
Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) 9,406
Viral hepatitis 7,694
Cannabis (Marijuana) 0

(1) Based on the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Second Edition, 2004, except for "cannabis"
(2) "Drug" includes both legal and illegal drugs.
(3) Mokdad, Ali H., PhD, James S. Marks, MD, MPH, Donna F. Stroup, PhD, MSc, Julie L. Gerberding, MD, MPH, "Actual Causes of Death in the United States, 2000," Journal of the American Medical Association, (March 10, 2004), G225 Vol. 291, No. 10, 1242.


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 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Sat May 18, 2013 9:03 am 
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Posts: 866
Location: NE Washington
Smoking Marijuana Causes ‘Complete Remission’ of Crohn’s Disease, No Side Effects, New Study Shows

http://blog.sfgate.com/smellthetruth/20 ... udy-shows/

Marijuana – scientific name “cannabis” – performed like a champ in the first-ever placebo-controlled trial of the drug to treat Crohn’s Disease, also known as inflammatory bowel disease.

The disease of the digestive tract afflicts 400,000 – 600,000 people in North America alone causing abdominal pain, diarrhea (which can be bloody), severe vomiting, weight loss, as well as secondary skin rashes, arthritis, inflammation of the eye, tiredness, and lack of concentration.

Smoking pot caused a “complete remission” of Crohn’s disease compared to placebo in half the patients who lit up for eight weeks, according to clinical trial data to be published the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Researchers at Israel’s Meir Medical Center took 21 people with intractable, severe Crohn’s disease and gave 11 of them two joints a day for eight weeks. “The standardized cannabis cigarettes” contained 23 percent THC and 0.5 percent CBD (cannabidiol). (Such marijuana is available on dispensary shelves in San Francisco, Oakland, and other cities that have regulated access to the drug.) The other ten subjects smoked placebo cigarettes containing no active cannabinoids.

Investigators reported that smoking weed caused a “complete remission” of Crohn’s Disease in five of the 11 subjects. Another five of the eleven test subjects saw their Crohn’s Disease symptoms cut in half. Furthermore, “subjects receiving cannabis reported improved appetite and sleep, with no significant side effects.”

The study is the first placebo-controlled clinical trial to assess the consumption of cannabis for the treatment of Crohn’s, notes NORML. All of the patients had intractable forms of the disease and did not respond to conventional treatments. Still, the United States government claims that marijuana is as dangerous as heroin and has no medical use. U.S. Attorney Melinda Haag is waging a war on safe access to medical cannabis in the Bay Area.


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 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 11:11 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 16, 2010 3:41 pm
Posts: 866
Location: NE Washington
Outlawing drugs like marijuana censors science, researchers say

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/06/1 ... chers-say/

The outlawing of drugs such as cannabis, magic mushrooms and other psychoactive substances amounts to scientific censorship and is hampering research into potentially important medicinal uses, leading scientists argued on Wednesday.

Laws and international conventions dating back to the 1960s have set back research in key areas such as consciousness by decades, they argued in the journal Nature Reviews Neuroscience.

"The decision to outlaw these drugs was based on their perceived dangers, but in many cases the harms have been overstated," said David Nutt, a professor of neuropsychopharmacology at Imperial College London.

In a statement accompanying the Nature Reviews paper, he said the laws amounted "to the worst case of scientific censorship since the Catholic Church banned the works of Copernicus and Galileo".

"The laws have never been updated despite scientific advances and growing evidence that many of these drugs are relatively safe. And there appears to be no way for the international community to make such changes," he said.

"This hindering of research and therapy is motivated by politics, not science."

Nutt and Leslie King, both former British government drugs advisers, and co-author David Nichols of the University of North Carolina, called for the use of psychoactive drugs in research to be exempted from severe restrictions.

"If we adopted a more rational approach to drug regulation, it would empower researchers to make advances in the study of consciousness and brain mechanisms of psychosis, and could lead to major treatment innovations in areas such as depression and PTSD," Nutt said.

Nutt was sacked as a government adviser in 2009 after publicly criticizing the government for ignoring scientific advice on cannabis and ecstasy. He has conducted a small human trial using psilocybin, the psychedelic ingredient in magic mushrooms.

His study, using volunteers, suggested the drug had the potential to alleviate severe forms of depression in people who did not respond to other treatments.

But in April, Nutt said his plans to conduct the first full clinical trial to explore psilocybin as a treatment had stalled because of stringent rules on the use of illegal drugs in research.

The scientists said their call for reform had been endorsed by the British Neuroscience Association and the British Association for Psychopharmacology.


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 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 11:13 pm 
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Posts: 866
Location: NE Washington
Industrial hemp returns to America: Colorado to plant first new major crop on US soil in 60 years

http://www.naturalnews.com/040602_hemp_ ... ation.html

The recent passage of Amendment 64 in Colorado, which legalizes the cultivation and recreational use of marijuana throughout the state, is having a major impact on the state's agricultural sector. But the biggest potential for economic growth may actually come from marijuana's non-psychoactive cousin hemp, which is right now being planted on U.S. soil for the first time in 60 years, thanks to the initiative's passage.

According to reports, a 60-acre plot of land in the southeastern corner of Colorado will be brimming with hemp plants. It will be the first time that hemp has been grown commercially on American soil in more than 60 years, and many more plots of land throughout the Rocky Mountain state are expected to follow suit, as the latest figures estimate that the hemp industry will outpace the marijuana industry by a factor of 10 or more.

"I believe this is really going to revitalize and strengthen farm communities," says Ryan Loflin, the man who intends to plant America's first hemp crop on his 60 acres of arable land, which formerly supported alfalfa.

Hemp is not marijuana, and there is no legitimate reason for its continued prohibition by the Feds
Many Americans are still unaware that there is even a difference between hemp and marijuana, both of which are prohibited by the federal government from being cultivated on U.S. soil. But unlike marijuana, hemp contains little-to-no THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the psychoactive component of marijuana that gets people "high," which means that hemp cannot be smoked, and thus cannot be not used as a drug.

To the contrary, hemp is an amazingly robust industrial plant, the various components of which can be used in a variety of commercial and nutritional applications. Hemp seed oil, for instance, and hemp protein are popular, omega-3 fatty acid-rich food products consumed by millions of health-conscious individuals. Hemp fiber is also sometimes used to reinforce concrete and to fortify automobile bodies and frames. And beyond this, hemp naturally cleanses soil and water, which makes it a powerful force for good in the environment.

"Hemp is food, animal feed, fiber, fuel, shelter," says Lynda Parker, a Colorado-based hemp supporter and founding member of a pro-hemp coalition in the Rocky Mountain state, as quoted by The Denver Post. "It cleans the air, the water, the soil. Hemp could be enormous for Colorado because we're the first state to legalize it."

Nationwide legalization of hemp would generate incalculable economic prosperity for Americans
But as previously mentioned, hemp somehow got lumped into the same category as marijuana as far as the federal government is concerned, which means Americans have been deprived for over half a century of reaping its many practical and economic benefits. Virtually all of the hemp used today in American products has to be imported from places like Canada due to legal prohibitions that block its cultivation here at home.

But all of this is changing in Colorado, where a reanimated hemp industry is quickly emerging from the dust bins of history, and reviving the economic climate of struggling rural Colorado. Similar to the current situation in many other states, many rural communities in Colorado have long suffered from a lack of healthy industry. But hemp could set the state on a whole new course toward economic prosperity that will most assuredly be the envy of the rest of the country.

"This is monumental for our industry," says Bruce Perlowin, CEO of company known as Hemp Inc. "It will unlock a clean industrial revolution that will be good for the economy, good for jobs and good for the environment."

To learn more about the many benefits of hemp, as well as America's rich, but little-known, hemp history, be sure to visit: http://hemphistory.org/


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 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 3:00 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:16 pm
Posts: 1572
Location: West Central Fl.
hi
Former Governor favors legal Medical Marijuana . Poll on bay news 9 says 69% favor legalization. Look at this link

http://www.baynews9.com/content/news/ba ... ze_ma.html

This guy was arrested for growing for his wife. Assistant District Attorney dropped charges saying punishment was worse than the crime. Does that set a president for others. How can they charge one and not another? Discrimination? glad it is not me. But it will become legal again. Have heard rumors that ex Gov. Charlie Crist may run again . Think he just bought a lot of votes.


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 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 11:47 pm 
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Posts: 866
Location: NE Washington
Novel Study Reports Marijuana Users Have Better Blood Sugar Control

http://www.parentherald.com/articles/14 ... ontrol.htm

Regular marijuana use is associated with favorable indices related to diabetic control, say investigators. They found that current marijuana users had significantly lower fasting insulin and were less likely to be insulin resistant, even after excluding patients with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Their findings are reported in the May issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

Marijuana (Cannabis sativa) has been used for centuries to relieve pain, improve mood, and increase appetite. Outlawed in the United States in 1937, its social use continues to increase and public opinion is swinging in favor of the medicinal use of marijuana. There are an estimated 17.4 million current users of marijuana in the United States. Approximately 4.6 million of these users smoke marijuana daily or almost daily. A synthetic form of its active ingredient, tetrahydrocannabinol, commonly known as THC, has already been approved to treat side-effects of chemotherapy, AIDS-induced anorexia, nausea, and other medical conditions. With the recent legalization of recreational marijuana in two states and the legalization of medical marijuana in 19 states and the District of Columbia, physicians will increasingly encounter marijuana use among their patient populations.

A multicenter research team analyzed data obtained during the National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES) between 2005 and 2010. They studied data from 4,657 patients who completed a drug use questionnaire. Of these, 579 were current marijuana users, 1,975 had used marijuana in the past but were not current users, and 2,103 had never inhaled or ingested marijuana. Fasting insulin and glucose were measured via blood samples following a nine hour fast, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated to evaluate insulin resistance.

Participants who reported using marijuana in the past month had lower levels of fasting insulin and HOMA-IR and higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). These associations were weaker among those who reported using marijuana at least once, but not in the past thirty days, suggesting that the impact of marijuana use on insulin and insulin resistance exists during periods of recent use. Current users had 16% lower fasting insulin levels than participants who reported never having used marijuana in their lifetimes.

Large waist circumference is linked to diabetes risk. In the current study there were also significant associations between marijuana use and smaller waist circumferences.

"Previous epidemiologic studies have found lower prevalence rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus in marijuana users compared to people who have never used marijuana, suggesting a relationship between cannabinoids and peripheral metabolic processes, but ours is the first study to investigate the relationship between marijuana use and fasting insulin, glucose, and insulin resistance," says lead investigator Murray A. Mittleman, MD, DrPH, of the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston.

"It is possible that the inverse association in fasting insulin levels and insulin resistance seen among current marijuana users could be in part due to changes in usage patterns among those with a diagnosis of diabetes (i.e., those with diabetes may have been told to cease smoking). However, after we excluded those subjects with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, the associations between marijuana use and insulin levels, HOMA-IR, waist circumference, and HDL-C were similar and remained statistically significant," states Elizabeth Penner, MD, MPH, an author of the study.

Although people who smoke marijuana have higher average caloric intake levels than non-users, marijuana use has been associated with lower body-mass index (BMI) in two previous surveys. "The mechanisms underlying this paradox have not been determined and the impact of regular marijuana use on insulin resistance and cardiometabolic risk factors remains unknown," says coauthor Hannah Buettner.

The investigators acknowledge that data on marijuana use were self-reported and may be subject to underestimation or denial of illicit drug use. However, they point out, underestimation of drug use would likely yield results biased toward observing no association.

Editor-in-Chief Joseph S. Alpert, MD, Professor of Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, comments, "These are indeed remarkable observations that are supported, as the authors note, by basic science experiments that came to similar conclusions.

"We desperately need a great deal more basic and clinical research into the short- and long-term effects of marijuana in a variety of clinical settings such as cancer, diabetes, and frailty of the elderly," continues Alpert." I would like to call on the NIH and the DEA to collaborate in developing policies to implement solid scientific investigations that would lead to information assisting physicians in the proper use and prescription of THC in its synthetic or herbal form."


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 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Tue Jul 09, 2013 4:55 am 
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Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:16 pm
Posts: 1572
Location: West Central Fl.
http://news.yahoo.com/former-mexican-pr ... 57130.html
They want to start a large pot distribution like RJR n tobacco


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 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Tue Jul 09, 2013 5:12 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2012 1:05 pm
Posts: 275
Location: South Portugal
smbdyiam wrote:
http://news.yahoo.com/former-mexican-president-fox-urges-marijuana-legalization-004257130.html
They want to start a large pot distribution like RJR n tobacco

Nice!


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 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Fri Aug 09, 2013 9:32 am 
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Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:16 pm
Posts: 1572
Location: West Central Fl.
hi
Dr that was at Tahiti after earthquake changes the way he thinks about Med. Marijuana /

http://news.yahoo.com/dr--sanjay-gupta- ... 11723.html

here is some of the reasons he changed mind.

76 percent of doctors say they approve of medical marijuana

Lee
ps Here is more on same story. Lee

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/medical-m ... 00147.html


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 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Mon Aug 12, 2013 3:53 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:16 pm
Posts: 1572
Location: West Central Fl.
a little more about Dr. Sanjay Gupta

http://www.unitedforcare.org/_dr_sanjay ... er_id=6925

Hope this works :lol: Lee


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 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Tue Aug 27, 2013 2:48 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:16 pm
Posts: 1572
Location: West Central Fl.
Skychaser wrote:
Novel Study Reports Marijuana Users Have Better Blood Sugar Control

http://www.parentherald.com/articles/14 ... ontrol.htm

Regular marijuana use is associated with favorable indices related to diabetic control, say investigators. They found that current marijuana users had significantly lower fasting insulin and were less likely to be insulin resistant, even after excluding patients with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Their findings are reported in the May issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

Marijuana (Cannabis sativa) has been used for centuries to relieve pain, improve mood, and increase appetite. Outlawed in the United States in 1937, its social use continues to increase and public opinion is swinging in favor of the medicinal use of marijuana. There are an estimated 17.4 million current users of marijuana in the United States. Approximately 4.6 million of these users smoke marijuana daily or almost daily. A synthetic form of its active ingredient, tetrahydrocannabinol, commonly known as THC, has already been approved to treat side-effects of chemotherapy, AIDS-induced anorexia, nausea, and other medical conditions. With the recent legalization of recreational marijuana in two states and the legalization of medical marijuana in 19 states and the District of Columbia, physicians will increasingly encounter marijuana use among their patient populations.

A multicenter research team analyzed data obtained during the National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES) between 2005 and 2010. They studied data from 4,657 patients who completed a drug use questionnaire. Of these, 579 were current marijuana users, 1,975 had used marijuana in the past but were not current users, and 2,103 had never inhaled or ingested marijuana. Fasting insulin and glucose were measured via blood samples following a nine hour fast, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated to evaluate insulin resistance.

Participants who reported using marijuana in the past month had lower levels of fasting insulin and HOMA-IR and higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). These associations were weaker among those who reported using marijuana at least once, but not in the past thirty days, suggesting that the impact of marijuana use on insulin and insulin resistance exists during periods of recent use. Current users had 16% lower fasting insulin levels than participants who reported never having used marijuana in their lifetimes.

Large waist circumference is linked to diabetes risk. In the current study there were also significant associations between marijuana use and smaller waist circumferences.

"Previous epidemiologic studies have found lower prevalence rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus in marijuana users compared to people who have never used marijuana, suggesting a relationship between cannabinoids and peripheral metabolic processes, but ours is the first study to investigate the relationship between marijuana use and fasting insulin, glucose, and insulin resistance," says lead investigator Murray A. Mittleman, MD, DrPH, of the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston.

"It is possible that the inverse association in fasting insulin levels and insulin resistance seen among current marijuana users could be in part due to changes in usage patterns among those with a diagnosis of diabetes (i.e., those with diabetes may have been told to cease smoking). However, after we excluded those subjects with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, the associations between marijuana use and insulin levels, HOMA-IR, waist circumference, and HDL-C were similar and remained statistically significant," states Elizabeth Penner, MD, MPH, an author of the study.

Although people who smoke marijuana have higher average caloric intake levels than non-users, marijuana use has been associated with lower body-mass index (BMI) in two previous surveys. "The mechanisms underlying this paradox have not been determined and the impact of regular marijuana use on insulin resistance and cardiometabolic risk factors remains unknown," says coauthor Hannah Buettner.

The investigators acknowledge that data on marijuana use were self-reported and may be subject to underestimation or denial of illicit drug use. However, they point out, underestimation of drug use would likely yield results biased toward observing no association.

Editor-in-Chief Joseph S. Alpert, MD, Professor of Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, comments, "These are indeed remarkable observations that are supported, as the authors note, by basic science experiments that came to similar conclusions.

"We desperately need a great deal more basic and clinical research into the short- and long-term effects of marijuana in a variety of clinical settings such as cancer, diabetes, and frailty of the elderly," continues Alpert." I would like to call on the NIH and the DEA to collaborate in developing policies to implement solid scientific investigations that would lead to information assisting physicians in the proper use and prescription of THC in its synthetic or herbal form."


A little more about this. This time from Yahoo and AJM

I think I read moderate blood sugar levels, better cholesterol HDL-C, better bmi, and smaller waist lines.
http://health.yahoo.net/articles/diabet ... ller-waist
American Jurnial of Medicine current Issue
http://www.amjmed.com/webfiles/images/j ... M11994.pdf
conclussions
With the recent trends in legalization of marijuana in the
United States, it is likely that physicians will increasingly
encounter patients who use marijuana and should therefore be aware of the effects it can have on common
disease processes, such as diabetes mellitus. We found
that current marijuana use is associated with lower levels
of fasting insulin, lower HOMA-IR, and smaller waist
circumference.


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 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Fri Aug 30, 2013 4:16 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:16 pm
Posts: 1572
Location: West Central Fl.
If federal law makes it illegal .It is illegal in all states. If it is legal in all states states can make it illegal in their state. So each state can pick and choose. But federal is the entire country. How can feds say it is legal in 2 states but not rest? Looks like it may be semi legal in some areas? Wow moving faster than I would have thought. But it is still about time.

http://news.yahoo.com/pot-now-essential ... 00853.html

I'm still in Fl.and still illegal here. Maybe not for long. Lee


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 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Mon Sep 02, 2013 12:54 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:16 pm
Posts: 1572
Location: West Central Fl.
hi for the aussies here.

http://news.yahoo.com/hemp-party-high-a ... 37596.html

going world wide.lee


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 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Fri Sep 13, 2013 12:37 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:16 pm
Posts: 1572
Location: West Central Fl.
just so everyone knows I still favor it. Or is that flavor it?

http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/201 ... reme-court
lee


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 Post subject: Re: Legalization and taxation of cannabis
PostPosted: Mon Sep 16, 2013 9:55 am 
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Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:16 pm
Posts: 1572
Location: West Central Fl.
I talked to a guy the other day who said" his brother was lazy" "his brother was a money grubber" "pot ruined his life, because he found he could sell it"
I got to thinking about this and asked him" do you know of one Industry that would not be affected if pot was legalized?"

Every one he listed was quickly eliminated Meds. energy ,farming . oil. when he finally gave up I asked "can you tell me how any change in legalizing would make his life worse?"

The only ones that we could think of where BIG oil government taxes. law enforcement etc Pharmaceuticals Drs. etc. Not any from the average working class, not in top 10 % of money makers.

Any one think of one thing that would make their life worse if Cannabis was legalized?


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