How to Grow Tobacco

How to grow and process tobacco at home for personal use. This is a non-commercial hobby website.
Tobacco Picture Gallery Click Here
It is currently Wed Dec 13, 2017 8:04 am

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 26 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2009 7:54 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 8:00 am
Posts: 4
Location: essex uk
if it is morse code please put in spaces and
I will read it easily thanks to my RAF training. if not, put me out of my misery.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: LMAO
PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2009 10:09 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2008 2:13 pm
Posts: 1155
Location: Nashville TN
Cigar Gregory wrote:
Cameron...
did you log on as queensmessenger...lol
I myself would LOVE to find out just what the BIG BOYS put into SOSA GOVERNOR cigars....my alltime fav.
My own cigars taste like ...umm..like...er....well not like cigars.
I'm thinking about putting them back in the kiln for a month...
Anyhow I really got a kick outta the code stuff,,,funny...
Great luck to all this year!!!


No, I didn't. That is a different person. Interesting information though I must say.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 24, 2009 12:18 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Nov 30, 2008 2:48 pm
Posts: 10
Location: Willamette valley, OR
If I could get the inside scoop, so to speak, on the way that commercial cigar manufacturers make certain products, I would be all ears. I would love to attempt to create a nice maduro wrapper using a proven technique from an established maker. However, I have some different ideas -- that I thought of -- about how to make them, and I'm going to try those, too. Part of the joy and satisfaction of this whole thing is doing it yourself, and figuring out how to go from tiny little seeds to tasty tobacco products in a way that is distinctly your own. Copying what commercial makers do would be, more or less, too easy.

I say "more or less" because, as I have discovered in my extensive research on the subject, this sort of information just isn't available. The techniques by which commercial operations cure and treat their tobacco are closely-guarded secrets. They have to maintain a level of secrecy about what they do, or their products would lose their uniqueness. Getting someone to leak these secrets would be pretty tough.

The implication that a given technique is better just because it is used by commercial operations is pretty laughable. Ford makes a decent automobile using standardized, highly repeatable processes, on very high volume continuous production lines. Rolls Royce makes incredible automobiles using few mechanized processes, build-to-order production scheduling and extensive hand-fitting. Ford probably turns out more than a thousand cars for every Rolls that comes off the line, but which car would most people judge to be superior?

Sure, someone who wanted to build a car from scratch in their garage might benefit from some schematics of a basic Ford transmission, but trying to copy what the huge company does would severely limit the potential of the small operation. With patience, craftsmanship and experimentation, a guy growing tobacco in his garden and rolling cigars on his kitchen table should be able to make something every bit as tasty and satisfying as a massive operation with access to hundreds of professional rollers and bales of leaf from all over the world.

The point is, commercial operations have many things to consider when deciding how to produce things. The big one is cost, with volume coming in a close second. Things are done in volume because it's often cheaper that way, and higher volume necessitates different means of handling products. That's why you won't see many conveyor belts or robots in a small job shop, and you won't see many old men in aprons and loupes hand-painting pin stripes on a 2009 Focus. Even if we could get access to the secrets of how big manufacturers process their tobacco, more likely than not, the information would be completely irrelevant to the home grower.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 08, 2009 2:36 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2009 9:20 am
Posts: 4
Yes you got it in one. As far as I can see the various methods used in these forums for curing are more or less what is done commercially, only on a much smaller scale. The trick to getting a good satisfying taste is simply one of proper curing coupled with some experimentation in flavouring\mixing different varieties. No magic in it, just try, try and try again and maybe you too will come up with a great taste. Remember the commercial tastes are simply there for mass appeal and profit. We can all do much better if proper curing is carried out. The insulated heated and misted case is by far the best way to succeed, followed by light misting with your own concoction before pressing into a brick for at least 6 months storeage then slicing to smoke.
Good luck
Doug


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 3:49 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 23, 2008 2:57 am
Posts: 71
Location: BC. Canada
Im probably also speaking on behalf of many of us here when I say that we are hobbyists that enjoy what we do , and we have many reasons for wanting to grow our own tobacco .

My main two reasons for wanting to grow my own is

1. To get rid of the chemically enhanced rubbish produced by tobacco manufacturers .

2. Is so that I don't have to pay anywhere for 6 to 12 dollars for a pack of smokes .

But also this is somthing I have wanted to do for a long time and want it to become a enjoyable hobby .

Yes , it would be great to have some input from somone that works in a factory . But Im not looking for a flavour that exact to any commercially made cigarette , and when I think about it , I would be disappointed if that's what it tasted like .
Im looking forward to blending and flavouring to a taste that I will enjoy .

And that were sites like this and coffin nails are great .
We can all get together and compare notes that improves growing curing and flavouring , and it helps to support a hobby for all of us .
Before we were all online , information like this was hard to come by , and I really like to be a part of it , and also like to help others out when I can .


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: MI5--CIA
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 12:50 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 11:30 am
Posts: 41
Location: united kingdom
Hi, Up4IT,
Ref the code ,it is not morse , the above code was first invented by MI5 to communicate with the CIA in 1940,the code was never broken.
my farther now 92 used it ,and he still has the machine to print it out with.
it looks like a bus conductors ticket machine,
the following code says,
Rollit Stokit & Smokit.

-...-_.----._-....---.-.--_.
Hootche.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 1:11 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 8:00 am
Posts: 4
Location: essex uk
Thanks for that. Sounds like the the perforating machine which we also had to read off when receiving some teleprinted messages. We are a dying breed, loved every minute of my work then.
Have just sown some of my home grown seed, am in year 2 now, managed to get lb. and half from last years crop and hoping to double it this year. The curing was a pain in the a... will be searching for an easier way this year. Cheers


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: MI5--CIA
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 1:51 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 11:30 am
Posts: 41
Location: united kingdom
Hi, UP4iT.
About curring ,no fancy,cooking and roasting, just hang it in a frost free dry place, and let nature do its job.
I grew coneticut broad leaf for the last two years,grew verry well in devon,U.K. with a bumper crop.
good look for 2009.
Hootche.
--_....-....----.._.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 2:12 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 8:00 am
Posts: 4
Location: essex uk
how long does it have to hang please


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: MI5--CIA
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 2:23 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 11:30 am
Posts: 41
Location: united kingdom
Up4iT,
If your 20 not very long.
40 a bit longer.
60 At least two years. Ha Ha Ha .
I have some good cigar tobacco at two years,
dark brown colour, good flavour,
Hootche.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 3:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2008 2:13 pm
Posts: 1155
Location: Nashville TN
Good one, Hootche.

To answer the question, once the midribs dry, your tobacco will be ready done hanging. Keep in mind though, you don't want the tobacco to dry too quickly. Shouldn't be much of a problem for you folks in the UK.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 26 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group