How to Grow Tobacco

How to grow and process tobacco at home for personal use. This is a non-commercial hobby website.
Tobacco Picture Gallery Click Here
It is currently Wed Dec 13, 2017 3:36 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 15 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Bees... related to all plant propagation
PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 7:58 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:02 am
Posts: 5541
Location: central coast of Kalifornia
.

Bees are significant in plant pollination and I find any information about them interesting.
The following articles are presented with credit to the original authors.
rc


Thu Oct 7, 12:21 pm ET
Culprits identified in worldwide honeybee die-off
By Brett Michael Dykes

By Brett Michael Dykes brett Michael Dykes – Thu Oct 7, 12:21 pm ET

Over the past few years, there's been some panic over a dramatic decrease in the world's honeybee population, an occurrence that has left many experts scratching their heads. Now it appears as though part of the bee die-off mystery has been solved.

As reported by Kirk Johnson of the New York Times, a somewhat odd pairing of entomologists and military scientists has pinpointed likely culprits: a fungus and a virus, both of which flourish in cool, wet environments. While scientists aren't certain, they believe the fungus and virus work together to hamper the insect's digestive system. Each is relatively harmless on its own, Johnson says, but their combination is deadly.

The findings by Army scientists in Maryland and bee experts in Montana are outlined in a paper published by the Public Library of Science's PLoS One.

The honeybee die-off -- populations in the United States alone are believed to have dropped 20 percent to 40 percent -- was a source of growing concern because of the vital role bees play in the food chain. As a 2007 "60 Minutes" report on the die-off noted, the bees are "crucial to the production of one-third of the foods we eat" because of their role in pollination.

The phenomenon of entire beehives disappearing has come to be known as colony collapse disorder.

Informed speculation previously blamed a host of factors for the die-off, such as pesticides and the cell-phone-driven increase of radiation in the atmosphere.

Though the identification of a cause is encouraging, scientists still find reason for concern.

"I hope no one goes away with the idea that we've actually solved the problem," Jeff Pettis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service told MSNBC. "We still have a great deal of research to do to resolve why bees are dying in the U.S. and elsewhere."




The following is a link to the research paper referenced in the bee article above.

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Ad ... 98.ambra01

..................



How to Design and Plant a Bee Garden
associatedcontent

Amanda C. Strosahl Amanda C. Strosahl – Thu Oct 7, 1:17 pm ET
Note: This article was written by an Associated Content Contributor. To become a Contributor and start publishing your own news articles, go to Associated Content.

Wildlife-loving gardeners across the world enthuse about planting butterfly gardens, but relatively few think to design and plant a bee garden. Designing and planting a bee garden will bolster the health of your garden and help conserve one of earth's treasures.

Why Design and Plant a Bee Garden
There are over 3,500 species of bees native to the United States. Unfortunately, their numbers are declining. In fact, the entire world is experiencing a shortage of bees. Why is this a problem?

Bees provide the much-needed service of pollinating plants. Approximately 80 percent of the flowering plants on earth require the help of pollinators, such as bees, for survival. That includes the plants which serve as food for humans. It is estimated one out of every three bites of food we take is made possible by bees and other pollinating wildlife.

Planting a well-designed bee garden provides food and shelter for bees, allowing them to nest and increase their population in safety. In return, the bees will increase the health and productivity of your garden and the gardens of those around you.

How to Design and Plant a Bee Garden
Variety is the spice of life to a bee. Bee gardens that use 10 or more species of bee-preferred plants tend to be the most successful. Bees will even visit less attractive plants in these gardens while they are there. Using a wide variety of preferred plants in your bee garden will also attract a wide variety of bees. This is especially true when you choose to use a nice assortment of plants native to your area.

Bee season goes from March through October. Choose a selection of plants that will bloom successively during this time period. A continuous provision of nectar and pollen will be available to bees if one type of bloom becomes available as another is dying out.

Flowers should be planted in large patches of like varieties to allow bees to dine in one spot for long periods of time. Gardens with scattered plants do not attract as many visits, and therefore receive less pollination, because bees expend too much energy flying between locations.

Bees thrive in gardens that are not extremely manicured, as solitary bees (ones who do not live in colonies) often prefer to make their nests in the ground. If you prefer the manicured look of mulch, leave some areas of dirt exposed for solitary bee nesting. Bee houses are an option when a manicured garden look is preferred. Place them in the shady areas of your garden where they will not be disturbed. Another option is to create bee nesting areas by filling planters and barrels with soil or sand. Place these where they will be protected from direct sunlight and rain.

Bees require a bit of water in addition to their nectar. A good bee garden will include a few puddles from which the bees can drink. Keep the puddles in muddy areas, as the bees will absorb needed minerals and salt from the soil as they sip the water.

Pesticides should not be used in bee gardens. Many pesticides work indiscriminately, killing off helpful insects along with the intended pest victims. If you truly need a pesticide in your garden, use a natural one made from microbes or plant derivatives and apply after sundown.

Choosing Plants When You Design and Plant a Bee Garden
The best plants to choose for your bee garden are varieties that are native to your area. Native plants will attract a nice variety of native bees. Certain bees require the native plants of their area to survive. Shop for your bee garden plants at a reputable nursery with knowledgeable staff who can assist you.

Plants that are not native to your area will attract bees as long as you pick the correct varieties. Stay away from anything with the word 'double' in the name or description. 'Double' plants have been bred to grow extra petals instead of anthers, the reproductive parts of the flowers, from which bees collect pollen. Stick to the old-fashioned single varieties of both non-native and native plants for your bee garden.

Bees are especially attracted to flowers that are purple, blue or yellow. They do not have the capability to see red and will rarely visit flowers in variations of that primary color. A few red flowers, such as bee balm, attract bees by reflecting ultraviolet light.

Small bees, which have short tongues, are most often attracted to small, shallow flowers. Use flowers such as daisy, marigold, butterfly weed, valerian, buttercup, aster, yarrow and Queen Anne's lace.

Larger bees, which have longer tongues, can handle slightly deeper flowers. They enjoy plants such as delphinium, larkspur, columbine, monkshood and snapdragon. Long-tongued bees are also attracted to various herbs, such as sage, oregano, mint and lavender.

Leaf-cutting bees are drawn to plants in the legume family and sweet clover.

Flowers to Use When You Design and Plant a Bee Garden
Bees require two types of plants to survive: pollen plants and nectar plants. Pollen from plants is taken back to their nests to feed the young bees. Nectar plants feed the adult bees to give them energy while looking for pollen. Some of the nectar is also added to the nests to feed the baby bees.

Below is a short list of bee-preferred plants based on blooming season. Some of these plants will provide bees with just nectar or just pollen, while others will provide both. Speak to specialists at your local nursery for additional suggestions for your bee garden based on your location.

Spring:

Nectar plants - Barberry, Bee plant, Blue Pea, Borage, Chinese Houses, Horehound, Lavender, Sage, Salvia, Scented Geranium, Wisteria

Pollen plants - Bush Anemone, California Poppy, Yarrow

Combination - Bidens, Blanket Flower, Blazing Star, Daisy, Marigold, Tansy

Summer:

Nectar plants - Basil, Catnip, Horehound, Lavender, Lamb's Ear, Mint, Oregano, Rosemary, Sage, Sea Holly, Spearmint, Thyme, Toadflax, Verbena

Pollen plants - Borage, California Poppy, Chaparral Nightshade, Tomato, Yarrow

Combination - Bidens, Black-eyed Susan, Blanket Flower, Bluebeard, Calenula, Cosmos, Daisy, Dusty Miller, Goldenrod, Gum Plant, Lemon Queen, Pincushion, Purple Coneflower, Pumpkin, Squash, Zucchini

Autumn:

Nectar plants - Autumn Sage, Rosemary, Toadflax, Verbena, Yellow Trumpet bush

Combination - Bluebeard, Cosmos, Pumpkin, Squash

Sunflowers are excellent bee plants that bloom throughout the season. They come in two types: with and without pollen. They will attract more bees to your bee garden if you choose the varieties with pollen.

<eof>

.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Bees... related to all plant propagation
PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 8:35 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2010 4:48 pm
Posts: 759
Location: Paige, TX
good info rusty
the one thing that really jumped out at me was the line about cell phone radiation.

Apparently the scientist who came up with that is himself a bee (either a wanna-bee or a yusta-bee)
unless bees are attune to that specific wavelength of RF, there is a whole lot more RF radiation coming from space than we could ever transmit from earth.

cell towers are everywhere now in urban areas and only skirt the major roads in rural regions. They have limited range as we have all experienced loosing calls in the country before. It's a rather narrow band of RF and even if the bees were sensitive, they would pack their little "bee-bags" and move further out into the country.
Now considering farms and crop pollination, yes there is usually a good signal around many farms not far from rural towers and this could be a problem, but only for the pollination aspect of a commercial crop, not over all bee population decline.
If they can show me proof that it zaps the poor lil buggers or gives them a major migrain, then I'll turn my cell off. otherwise it's another case of mainstream media throwing out (dare I say) buzz words that to the general public sounds probable or possible cause and puts the "dancing with the stars" and "survivor" fans into a panic and want the gov to step in and do something about it.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Bees... related to all plant propagation
PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 9:06 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:02 am
Posts: 5541
Location: central coast of Kalifornia
OK, CJ...

Man! Ur quick!

...U gotta remember I'm born and raised Kalifornia... I'm a native!

Not really the scientific background u got, but the whole clan are engineers, 'cept for... well, guess who's the black sheep...

I DO believe there is some as yet unquantified influence by RF in our daily lives. We're generally aware of the microwave oven advisories, now cell phone use, (extensive) is suspect because the transmitter is right next to your noggin... and when I was active in ham radio, we considered the effect of using HT's next to your head... and we used up to 5w's in some of them. It was said first noticeable negative influence might be to the eyes.... when using the high freqs.

Then, there are some significant health claims made originating from any number of ill effects from significant gauss fields present near electrical transformer stations, and a couple schools and public buildings with large transformer and distribution rooms.
There were some big lawsuits, and IIRC, the injured parties prevailed. I think this information may be retrieved with some sort of keyword search including 'school yard', and 'Montecito, CA'.
There was also one 'cluster' of debilitated individuals on the east coast, IIRC.

(It's been a long time since I reviewed info on this subject, so forgive me if my terminology might be incorrect.)

Just to prove I AM a Kalifornian :) , there was a fellow named Wilhelm Reich who proposed something called orgone energy???
He designed an Orgone Chamber in which a person could ensconce himself and escape the bombardment of cosmic radiation.
...Ha! A friend built one, and it was indeed noticeably 'peaceful' when inside it, reclined upon an internal pad.

Now, just to show I have no 'short stories', and this probably has nothing to do with bees, I'll relate my experience with electrical fields and high voltage transmission lines... Before deer hunting season in CA zone D-12 I motored around some of the back roads which led through the hills surrounding our town. They led up steep mountains, and the road was known, of course, as Powerline Rd. Imagine that! It was damp and very foggy that one morning as I found myself within just a few feet of the high tension wires, and associated towers... I got out of the truck, to look along the hill, and found myself withing about 50-60ft of the actual wires.
In the fog, (I wasn't gonna see no deer!), the spurious energy radiating from those lines was really noticeable... my hair and beard began to stand up/out... a LOT! and I did feel rather ansy, in addition to being entertained by the phenomena. Kinda spooky-like.
I got the heck back away from them...
SO, I just don't feel being near radiated energy is a good thing.
Any way u choose to look at it.

???
rc


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Bees... related to all plant propagation
PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 10:34 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2010 4:48 pm
Posts: 759
Location: Paige, TX
our deer here in texas just love the clear-cut areas under those high tension lines :shock:

Yep, 80,000 volts at 400hz will sure throw out some Teslas in the fog. :wink:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Bees... related to all plant propagation
PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 7:17 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 29, 2010 5:53 pm
Posts: 89
Location: USA, California
This thread makes me recall a CB radio phenomenon.

I used to run a 200 watt linear amplifier with my CB/Ham radio set up. It was dirty, and would bleed over cell and telephone lines as well as any close by TV's stereo's or other speakers and so on. Needless to say this wouldn't make you any friends if you lived someplace where you had neighbors close by.

The interesting thing though, and it makes a good graphic example of RF radiation, was that you could stand a foot or so away from the antenna and hold a florescent light tube,
(like say from a 4 foot shop light) and when you keyed up the radio's microphone it would light up the tube. This was one of those, have to see it to believe it sort of things.

It was an impressive trick to show your friends, it also served as a visible reminder to me at least just how much RF radiation was zooming around me in the air, that I could not see.

- Bullseye


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Bees... related to all plant propagation
PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 10:16 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2010 4:48 pm
Posts: 759
Location: Paige, TX
the 4th state of matter is a very interesting subject and very sensitive to high potentials of RF. When I was a teenager I would salvage the small neon tubes from pilot lights of old tube radios and use it to check if an electric fence was on without touching it myself. whether the plasma is generated by a florescent tube, gas laser, or neon light, all are sensitive to RF.

This could be the basis of the bees dilemma, chemicals of their brain or body are being effected by that specific frequency of cell phones.

I apologize for my rant earlier today, but it drives me nuts on how these people (so called scientific experts) offer scare tactics to the general public on a topic that is already under suspicion without providing any explanation to merit their comments.
"cell phones are killing the honey bees!, film at 11! ",
please! give me a break.
What? are folks swatting them with their old nokias or is this a new iPhone app? 8)
RF has been in our world a long time before Guglielmo Marconi had his cronies send "tap tap tap" from England to Newfoundland
It's been man's arrogance that since we have developed a way to control and regulate and modulate RF to suite our needs that we feel we "Invented" the Frequency spectrum, somebody else did it long before man was around
"And God create light..."
and that's what got me huffy.
sorry, getting down from my soap box now.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Bees... related to all plant propagation
PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 10:48 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:02 am
Posts: 5541
Location: central coast of Kalifornia
Well, that's how I got the opportunity to learn how to wire houses...
Wasn't afraid of electricity.

When i was a kid, I learned a dry finger and dry shoes were just fine for checking to see if the fence was juiced or not!

It was quite a few years before I learned that when u work on 50a of 220vac live it will cook your finger just like one a them weenie zappers whether ur finger is dry or not. :shock: specially when a screwdriver gets involved !

Tesla sure did some fun stuff, didn't he?
Horses trying to go down the street w sparks shooting off their hooves n all !

:)
rc


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Bees... related to all plant propagation
PostPosted: Sat Oct 09, 2010 5:06 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 29, 2010 5:53 pm
Posts: 89
Location: USA, California
It takes a bit more electricity to move a cow or a horse, than it does to discourage a person.

I quickly learned location was very important as well.

While not the most scientific method, I could just put my hand on the electric fence that I had wired to keep the horses in the corral. All you had to do was just wait for a pulse to see if it was working. While it didn't really feel good, it was tolerable, and it would let you know that the thing was on and functioning. It was also mildly unpleasant to bump into it when you weren't expecting a shock, but not really all that bad, just startling really.

One day though, I crawled under the fence and managed to contact the wire with the back of my head.

This was a whole new ball game for me. It knocked me down, and scrambled my brain up real good.

I remember laying on the ground afterward and covering my head with my arms while looking around for the guy with the baseball bat who hit me. After a few minutes of not seeing anyone, I had convinced myself that maybe it wasn't a person who clobbered me. Then I started thinking that perhaps a horse kicked me in the back of the head when I wasn't looking, or maybe a really big branch had fallen out of the tree and knocked me down.

After a few minutes of self inspection, I managed to work out what had happened to me. The only thing that was really hurt, was my pride. Fortunately I was alone at the time, and no one except for a few horses were around to witness my monumental stupidity.

Needless to say I sure gave the electric fence a wide berth after that incident.

- Bullseye


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Bees... related to all plant propagation
PostPosted: Sat Oct 09, 2010 7:02 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2010 4:48 pm
Posts: 759
Location: Paige, TX
a person can get hit with several thousand volts and not to any real harm, but it's the amps that'll kill ya!
it only takes 300 milliamps to stop your heart.

unless it's one of those 50 mile chargers, most electric fences are putting out around 10,000 to 20,000 volts, but only 10 to 15 milliamps, just enough to get your attention but no real harm done (unless you get your nogging on it first - ouch!)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Bees... related to all plant propagation
PostPosted: Tue Oct 12, 2010 8:33 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 04, 2009 6:03 am
Posts: 2704
Well I'll admit that while I understand just a little about lots of things I really know very little about this subject and these radio freq. I do know about running into electric fences and hitting them so hard you wrap the wire around your head .

Yea man it will knock you down and makes a right good primitive verson of the X Ray . I did this one night at the old place ( farm we sold ) . At the back gate I had a pole where the wire running to the fence was too high to get into . It went from too high and untouchable to about knee high in a span of about 20 feet .

I had it on a angle to where I could open the gate day or night and not accidently get into it . Well they was a tree there the pole was fastened to and the wind had been blowing good that night . A darn limb fell from the tree and landed on my wire making it swag and now a couple feet lower .

I forget just why but for some reason I was running through the gate just knowing I knew where everything was and how to stay out of my fence wire . Needless to say that wire was now right about fore head level OUCH I seen my brain that night . I seen the wires that fasten my eyebaqlls to my brain lol yes I am serious

Sparks flew and just luckly the light was able to excape from my eye sockets or I think it would have blowed the top my dayum head off . I've been shocked before but never nothing like wrapping that wire around your head . The light was so bright it was like an instant flash of a welder inside my head .

Funny thing was is that like a camera with a low battery that frame froze there for a couple minutes after all the sizzlin stopped .

LMAO noo never again do I care to have that happen .


Edit

About the bees I think that could be very bad for everything . And I do hope they can figure it out and prevent them from dying off . But have to agree with CJ that too many people use things like this with no proof just trying to cause trouble and to scare people .

Is this guy that said this from California ?? Is this the same guy that has the happy cows and thinks only happy cows should be sloughtered ?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Bees... related to all plant propagation
PostPosted: Tue Oct 12, 2010 10:38 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 9:10 pm
Posts: 89
Location: Philadelphia, Pa.
'Cold and wet' I guess that we should all pray for global warming. I don't have any bee's cell phone number, nor do they have mine ( well, at least they don't call... Maybe the line is always buzzy! Maybe you you should put more of the blame on the rampant, widespread use of Sevin (carboryl). It is illegal in Europe. We are supposed to grow organically at the garden, but some people use it to try to control things like potato beetles on their tomatoes and eggplants. If you are Lucky it will only kill the first instar state of the beetle nymph (of four stages) and the ones that Do live will pass on their resistance for many generations. In the meantime, you are killing the good critters, like ladybugs, lacewings, mantises, sheildbugs, predator wasps, toads, maybe earthworms and etc. I am tired of hearing that the only good bug is a dead bug. It Will take years and a lot of work, but you can create a balance in the soil so that you barely need to Till anymore, although I am not That good... Yet.
Oh yeah, I almost forgot to mention that Sevin Also kills bees!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Bees... related to all plant propagation
PostPosted: Sat Oct 30, 2010 10:04 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 04, 2009 6:03 am
Posts: 2704
Drew !! I am confussed :? :?

Just what does barley having to till your garden have to do with Bee's dying off in record numbers ?? Maybe you just plowed all them bee's under ?? ever think of that ??

:roll: :roll: Just messin with ya Drew keep feeding them lady bugs all those strong chemicals . Maybe they will get strong enough to survive anything mankind has to kill them with


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Bees... related to all plant propagation
PostPosted: Sun Oct 31, 2010 5:23 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2010 4:48 pm
Posts: 759
Location: Paige, TX
If the BT spray and DE powder doesn't work to keep the beetles, grubs and worms away, then just stand around in the garden and make a bunch of cell calls, that'll sure kill 'em off! :lol:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Bees... related to all plant propagation
PostPosted: Wed Nov 03, 2010 7:53 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun May 02, 2010 10:04 pm
Posts: 104
Location: new zealand
i work in kiwifruit orchards spraying and have been working with bees. when the bees are in the orchards we only spray at night when the flowers are out.
when it comes to spraying flowers, (the bees are working them) its not so much how toxic the chemical is, but they drown, from the spraying.
a bit of usless info. :)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Bees... related to all plant propagation
PostPosted: Thu Nov 04, 2010 7:54 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 8:44 am
Posts: 905
Location: North-central Texas
Black:
So you're a real kiwi then! You must be heading into spring down there. Would love to see some pics of your grow setup. I've never been there, but must have lots of pasture land, we sell lots of kiwi lamb here in the US. And i know you have a large dairy industry there, i work with dairies here in Texas. And of course, we have kiwi fruit in all our supermarkets, NZ has done a good marketing job in the US.
Look forward to hearing/seeing your tobacco grow this year.
Regards, Neal


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 15 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group