How to Grow Tobacco

How to grow and process tobacco at home for personal use. This is a non-commercial hobby website.
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 Post subject: Re: Tobacco Flowers for Ornimental Reasons
PostPosted: Thu Feb 27, 2014 8:15 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 12, 2013 6:10 pm
Posts: 21
Location: ohio
Can I get some?


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 Post subject: Re: Tobacco Flowers for Ornimental Reasons
PostPosted: Thu Feb 27, 2014 10:07 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:02 am
Posts: 5541
Location: central coast of Kalifornia
Actually, it would take an effort to kill ours!
rc


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 Post subject: Re: Tobacco Flowers for Ornimental Reasons
PostPosted: Fri Feb 28, 2014 6:14 am 
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Joined: Fri Jul 12, 2013 9:53 am
Posts: 65
Location: Palestine, TX
I'm looking up to see if it is possible to grow artichoke here in Texas. Several varieties work well for Texas gardeners, including:
• Green Globe (standard variety)
• Imperial Star (less vigorous than
Green Globe)
• Harmony
• Madrigal
• Emerald
• Grand Beurre
• Talpiot
• Purple Sicilian (purple globe)
Plan before fall planting because it
can take up to 60 days before plants are of
suitable size for planting outside. In Central
Texas, artichoke is transplanted in mid-
October, which means seeds must be
started in mid-August.
Grow slowly in the fall and winter (October
through January), but in early spring artichoke
plants will rapidly increase in size.
The main harvest usually
occurs in April and May.

Sounds like a lot of work to grow them

janetta


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 Post subject: Re: Tobacco Flowers for Ornimental Reasons
PostPosted: Fri Feb 28, 2014 6:16 am 
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Joined: Fri Jul 12, 2013 9:53 am
Posts: 65
Location: Palestine, TX
Artichoke is a perennial plant so once
the harvest is done in June, cut the plant
back to soil level. This will put the plant
crown into a dormant stage during the
summer. The plant will send out shoots in
the fall. The new shoots can be dug out to
be replanted into a new location in the
garden or left in place to produce another
year. Make sure you leave only the most
vigorous shoot on the old plant for production
next spring.

I guess once planted it will be easy from there. I think I will try to grow them.


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 Post subject: Re: Tobacco Flowers for Ornimental Reasons
PostPosted: Fri Feb 28, 2014 9:19 am 
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Joined: Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:02 am
Posts: 5541
Location: central coast of Kalifornia
Here's a pic of ours, J.

Image

I think this will be the 4th year on the plants...

They were started from some storebought 4" pots.
One is up against a fence, the other is underneath a large bush...

Don't give 'em much attention except when a leaf breaks..
We hack away at 'em when leaves look crappy at the end of the season... or just leave em scraggly.

I'll look for our seeds and try to find em, if you wish...
Best
rc


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 Post subject: Re: Tobacco Flowers for Ornimental Reasons
PostPosted: Fri Feb 28, 2014 10:33 am 
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Joined: Fri Jul 12, 2013 9:53 am
Posts: 65
Location: Palestine, TX
Thank You rusty


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 Post subject: Re: Tobacco Flowers for Ornimental Reasons
PostPosted: Sat Mar 01, 2014 7:28 am 
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Joined: Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:02 am
Posts: 5541
Location: central coast of Kalifornia
lol

ok

the search is ON !

maybe in my next life I will be organized

Nah... more fun gardening, fishing, riding motorbikes, kayaking, building stuff!
:-)
rc


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 Post subject: Re: Tobacco Flowers for Ornimental Reasons
PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 8:34 am 
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Joined: Sat Mar 01, 2014 8:55 pm
Posts: 57
I've got the same dilemma. My mother loves hummingbirds and flowers of all sorts, and I offered to plant a few of my surplus baccy plants around her house as I've hear they're like hummingbird magnets. Now I need to figure out what strain is best.


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 Post subject: Re: Tobacco Flowers for Ornimental Reasons
PostPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2014 6:59 am 
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Joined: Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:02 am
Posts: 5541
Location: central coast of Kalifornia
H, do some surfing through the photo gallery to look at various people's strains to see what the look like...

This is from Palmettoguy.

Image
Catterton

Many of them grow quite differently!
rc


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 Post subject: Re: Tobacco Flowers for Ornimental Reasons
PostPosted: Wed Jan 07, 2015 12:13 am 
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Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2014 1:56 am
Posts: 63
Getting back to tobacco, I'm planning to grow some Nicotiana species this year mainly for ornamental reasons. In zone 3, I'm much too far north I think for tobacco production, I think that is all in zone 6 or 7 or higher. But I understand plants flower weeks before the leaves ripen, so I could grow them for their flowers at least. And some species were initially selected based on the heady-scent of their blossoms. So I bought seeds for heirloom species of N. Alata and N. Sylvestris, some of the most fragrant species. Also planning to grow N. tobaccum and N. Rustica, to see how they look. Maybe N. tobaccum's pinkish flowers will attract hummers to my backyard?... my hummingbird feeder failed to do so on its own last summer :(

Question is, do the ornamental species contain nicotine? I've read various things about N. Sylvestris, ranging from it's leaves having zero nicotine to being several times more potent than N. tobaccum (the species grown commercially). No idea about N. Alata.

Also, the last time I used any tobacco was at least 5 years ago on a fishing trip, when I smoked a stogie someone brought me back from Cuba (geez, they burn for like an hour!). If a largely non-user were to experiment with a home-made N. Rustica smoke, would my brain melt? Would I puke myself inside-out?


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 Post subject: Re: Tobacco Flowers for Ornimental Reasons
PostPosted: Wed Jan 07, 2015 12:37 am 
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Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2014 1:56 am
Posts: 63
BTW, the N. Rustica question isn't purely academic. I planted some seeds over the past few months to get an idea about how early I should start seeds in the Spring, since they will be competing for very limited space with my pepper, tomato, and onion bedding plants. The N. tobaccum seeds germinated but died. The N. Alata and N. Sylvestris were planted 3 weeks later and are growing well but still young... I hope to get them to flower indoors this winter to see if I want that scent in my garden next summer. The N. Rustica are most advanced, and I hope to get them to flower indoors so I can confirm that they are really N. Rustica. But then do I just chuck them out, or try to do a crude dry/cure? Here's how they looked on January 6 (the second one in the upper right was transplanted from the original 2-inch pot, so lags behind due to transplant shock:

These N. Rustica seedlings are 7 weeks (49 days) in my basement since I first wet the seed....
Image


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 Post subject: Re: Tobacco Flowers for Ornimental Reasons
PostPosted: Wed Jan 07, 2015 6:55 am 
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Don555 I grow tobacco in zone 2A so you should be able to grow in zone 3. If you start your plants 6 to 8 weeks inside and transplant outside when the chance of last frost is over you should be fine. There are some early maturity plants in the 55 to 60 days ( not to sure about this).


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 Post subject: Re: Tobacco Flowers for Ornimental Reasons
PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2015 1:19 am 
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Posts: 868
Location: NE Washington
Sylvestris has a nicotine content of 3.9%. Most bright leafs run between 1-3%. They are few that go up to 6%. Burleys average a little higher at 4-5%. Orientals range all over in nicotine content from very low at under .5% up to over 4%.

Rusticas are very mild to smoke but the nicotine can be high. 5-6% is probably average but it can go up to 9%, especially with a lot of nitrogen. Rusticas are fast growers and some types start to bloom in 30-35 days from transplant. Most take about 45 days. Mature plants take light frost well and it is probably the most hardy of all tobaccos.The leaves aren't really hard to cure but they never color up as nice as Tobaccums do. Mine always end up a dullish brown with hints of green. It's not real pretty, but it smokes and tastes fine.

Alata's are grown as ornamentals. They start blooming in only 3-4 weeks after transplant and continue growing and blooming all summer long. The leaves are very small, I cured out some one year to see how it smoked. Worst thing I ever put a match too. lol Affinis has the widest range of colors and wonderful scent. Jasmine is pure white and one of the most fragrant flowers I have ever encountered. The flowers open in mid to late afternoon and stay open all night. Plant a corner full of them and they will fill your whole yard with a beautiful scent in the late afternoons and evenings. Hummingbirds love them!

There are several tobaccum varieties that don't require a very long growing season and a few that the leaves ripen even before the plants are considered "mature" and start blooming. If you have 70 frost free days in summer you can grow tobacco. Some types you can do in 60 days from planting them out. Think of them like tomatoes. They have the same basic requirements. If you can grow tomatoes, you can grow tobacco.

You should start your seeds 8 weeks before the last frost date. You can start them earlier (10-12weeks) if you put them in 4-6 inch pots and have space to grow them until all danger of frost has passed. Seedlings should be in full light within 2-3 days of sprouting. A greenhouse is best, but artificial light works well too. Harden them off slowly over a week or two before they go outside to stay.

Hope this helps you some

Sky


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 Post subject: Re: Tobacco Flowers for Ornimental Reasons
PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2015 3:39 am 
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Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2014 1:56 am
Posts: 63
Thanks folks, great information. If sylvestris is similar in nicotine to tobaccum, and has the added bonus of super-scented flowers, I'm presuming it isn't grown for smokes because it either is a nasty smoke, or has leaves too small to make it useful?

I think I have 100-120 frost free days, so it sounds like tobacco is feasible here. Kind of surprising to me, since I can't think of any commercial tobacco grows within 1000 kilometres. But if lakota can grow it in zone 2a....

Ideally I'd like to grow some in the front garden to have the scent from the flowers waft in through our living-room window on summer evenings. But front garden space is very tight, so I'll probably try them in the backyard veggie garden where hopefully they might help draw some hummers into the yard to find my hummingbird feeders. And if it works out well and the scent is appealing and permeating, then the following year I'll make room out front.


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 Post subject: Re: Tobacco Flowers for Ornimental Reasons
PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2015 9:01 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 16, 2010 3:41 pm
Posts: 868
Location: NE Washington
don555 wrote:
If sylvestris is similar in nicotine to tobaccum, and has the added bonus of super-scented flowers, I'm presuming it isn't grown for smokes because it either is a nasty smoke, or has leaves too small to make it useful?


Sylvestris has big beautiful white flowers but doesn't have much scent. Nothing like Jasmine does. Sylvestris has fairly large leaves and it smokes fine. Most people don't grow it because there are other tobaccos that produce better.

http://nwtseeds.com/Sylvestris.htm
http://nwtseeds.com/Jasmine.htm
http://nwtseeds.com/affinis.htm


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