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 Post subject: Mullein
PostPosted: Thu Jul 08, 2010 9:32 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 27, 2010 10:10 am
Posts: 32
I noticed that a few people are having issues with either finding or getting mullein. Here in MO its hella thick around the roads and the fields. I'm going to harvest as much as i can (and seeds) and dry it out once it stops raining and i get my weekend. I'm sure i will have extra. If anyone needs any let me know.


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Fri Jul 09, 2010 8:44 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2010 9:19 pm
Posts: 166
Location: N. Central Alabama
Goy lots of it in the yard... anyone want any just PM me...


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Fri Jul 09, 2010 10:28 am 
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Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 8:44 am
Posts: 905
Location: North-central Texas
Is mullein smoked alone, or mixed with tobacco, or both? Just for my education, I use snuff myself. Wife smokes though, is mullein medicinal when mixed with tobacco? Might be a good combo.


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Fri Jul 09, 2010 10:56 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 10:50 am
Posts: 1624
Location: NW Arkansas, USA zone 7A elevation 1561 feet
I tried smoking some last year, not bad, but no nicotine...

Lonnie uses it in his chewing tobacco recipe.

So it does have multiple uses, and is often the base of herbal smoking mixes, with or without tobacco.


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Tue Aug 24, 2010 10:43 am 
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Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2010 4:02 pm
Posts: 17
Location: Willamette Valley, Creswell Oregon
Hey all,
Did a wee-bit of a search and couldn't find the answer. What exactly is MULLEIN and what properties does it contribute to the chew? Does it go by another name? I live in Oregon and I can say that I've NEVER heard of it.
could someone please describe the properties and by chance what process you use to add it to the chew?
Thanks so much in advance.
Scotch


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Tue Aug 24, 2010 7:15 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:02 am
Posts: 5541
Location: central coast of Kalifornia
I was interested in mullein, also. Does anyone besides Lonnie use it in a recipe ?
What would the flavoring be compared to ?
rc


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Fri Sep 10, 2010 6:40 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2010 4:02 pm
Posts: 17
Location: Willamette Valley, Creswell Oregon
Anyone tell me what Mullein is used for in chew? Still pretty curious?
I know Lonnie uses it, but what for?
Thanks for any info!
Scotch


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Fri Sep 10, 2010 7:44 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 05, 2009 5:56 am
Posts: 148
Suppose to be good for the lungs-flowers and leaves. Tried it a few times as a tea and smoke-not to palatable.


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2010 9:58 am 
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Joined: Thu Jan 01, 2009 10:16 am
Posts: 798
Location: near Rising Sun,Maryland USA
I believe it is added to a chew recipe to make it taste similar to a store bought variety of chew such as Redman.


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2010 10:58 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2010 12:59 pm
Posts: 159
Location: Berks Co.Pa
http://www.kingdomplantae.net/commonMullein.php
This Eurasian immigrant is a common biennial herb which produces a basal rosette of large, stalked, thick, fuzzy, oval leaves in the first year. These leaves often survive through the winter, under the snow. In the second year, mullein sends up a stoutly erect, sometimes branched, flower stalk, up to eight feet tall, which is also fuzzy, and has smaller, fuzzy, oval, unstalked, alternate leaves.

The flower stalk makes this one of the plants I can still identify at 70 miles per hour, and often do, since roadsides are one of its favorite places. I also regularly find it in old fields, disturbed areas, vacant lots, wood edges, and in the middle of trails. It prefers alkaline soils with good drainage, likes full sun, and doesn't mind poor soil
The yellow, unstalked, flowers appear in densely packed spikes, and bloom pretty much at random, a few at a time, from spring until fall. The flowers are small, an inch or less across, and cup-shaped, with five petals (fused at their bases), five stamens, and one pistil. The flowers are fragrant and taste sweet, the leaves are not fragrant and taste slightly bitter.

However, the fresh or dried leaves do make a pleasant, soothing, mucilaginous tea (assuming you strain all the little hairs out). This tea can be consumed as a regular beverage, and it's good for you, providing vitamins B2, B5, B12, and D, choline, hesperidin, para amino benzoic acid, magnesium, and sulfur, but mullein tea is primarily valued as an effective treatment for coughs and lung disorders.

Medicinally, it is expectorant, anti-inflammatory, antibiotic, astringent, and demulcent (which means soothing). It is especially soothing (and is a good tonic for) the lungs, mucous membranes, and glands. An alternative method, used in American Indian medicine and elsewhere, is to dry the leaves and smoke them, either alone or blended with other herbs (such as coltsfoot or jimsonweed), to treat asthma, bronchitis or other lung problems. This may actually work, but as I haven't tried it, I'll only vouch for the tea, which really does seem to help and may be somewhat sedative as well.

Mullein also contains coumarin and rotenone, a natural insecticide and fish poison, which is supposed to be non-toxic to mammals. It's important to use caution with medicinal or edible plants until you're familiar with their effects on your system. Start small, pay attention, and remember that all things are best in moderation.

The leaves are a rubefacient, which means that if you rub them against your skin it will become red and irritated, which is something to remember when you're in the woods looking for toilet paper substitutes. It also means that when you've been handling it, your hands get a warm, fuzzy feeling. Some people have used this property to their supposed advantage as a natural sort of makeup, which is how mullein acquired the name 'Quaker rouge'.

A tea made from the flowers reportedly has strongly soothing, sedative, properties. The flowers are used medicinally in the treatment of migraines and as a local antibiotic and bactericide.

The flowers make a bright yellow dye, which can be used to dye hair or cloth. The addition of sulfuric acid will produce a color-fast green. If you then add an alkali, to raise the Ph, the dye becomes brown.

Through the summer and early fall, the flowers fade, and the fruits appear. These fruits are hard, woody, capsules with five divisions, which open on one end when mature. After the fruits have matured, the plant dies, but the dry, brown, flower stalk persists through the winter, standing out against the snow. At this stage, if you soak the flower heads in tallow or something similar, it's supposed to make a good torch. The leaves, dried and rolled, have been used as lamp wicks. It's also helpful both as tinder for starting your campfire and as a quick burning fuel. If you're still not warm enough, the leaves also make pretty good insulation when placed inside shoes or clothing. From these uses, mullein is also called torches, candlewick plant, and beggar's blanket.

Mullein seeds, which are tiny, are reported to be toxic and have been used as a narcotic to stun fish.

Animals won't eat mullein, because all those little hairs irritate their mucous membranes, but insects don't mind them. If you're trying to grow it, watch for weevils and slugs. Mullein also attracts a wide variety of pollinators, including bees, flies, and butterflies.

Mullein is easily controlled by weeding, though I don't know why you'd want to except in wilderness and natural areas, where it's often considered an invasive species.


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Sun Sep 12, 2010 5:50 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 06, 2009 11:53 am
Posts: 71
Location: South Central Michigan
oldemagics,

While I really appreciate your efforts in educating us to the properties of Mullein, after reading your reply I'm still in the dark as to what it's use in chew or as an additive to pipe tobacco really does.

Dino :?


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 1:22 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2010 4:02 pm
Posts: 17
Location: Willamette Valley, Creswell Oregon
Dino,
I believe it used to add a flavor quality to the chew to mimic the taste of a straight leaf such as Redman, Levi Garret.....
As I read, It irritates the mucuos membranes of animals, so how would one prepare to be added to chew?

That was very informative and I think I get what it does, so Thank you for that.

I did find some seeds as I live about 5 miles from an herb store and I have planted them to see what happens.
I hope that Lonnie will post something here about how to add the leaves to the chew.

Thanks again for the good article and references.
Scotch


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 2:46 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 11, 2009 10:50 am
Posts: 1624
Location: NW Arkansas, USA zone 7A elevation 1561 feet
I found mullein very palatable in a smoke.
All it needed was nicotine.
I saved leaves to blend in with tobacco that had too much nicotine, too strong of a flavor in one area or another.
I consider it as something used to dilute, the too strong in all areas!
It adds no flavor or nicotine of its own.

Think of it as the equivalent of adding water to your tea or coffee to dilute it a bit.

It is also used as an herbal smoking base. You add various flavors to it, and get no nicotine at all, but you do get the sensation of smoking and the warmth of smoke in your lungs.


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 5:33 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2007 10:08 am
Posts: 21
sigsandjeeps wrote:
Dino,
I believe it used to add a flavor quality to the chew to mimic the taste of a straight leaf such as Redman, Levi Garret.....
As I read, It irritates the mucuos membranes of animals, so how would one prepare to be added to chew?

That was very informative and I think I get what it does, so Thank you for that.

I did find some seeds as I live about 5 miles from an herb store and I have planted them to see what happens.
I hope that Lonnie will post something here about how to add the leaves to the chew.

Thanks again for the good article and references.
Scotch

Lonnie's already posted a good description complete with pictures. See the "3 steps to good chew" thread.


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 Post subject: Re: Mullein
PostPosted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 5:46 pm 
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Joined: Sun Dec 06, 2009 11:53 am
Posts: 71
Location: South Central Michigan
Thanks. I'check out Lonnie's thread.

Dino


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